The Senior Executive Service (SES) Selection Process

What Is a USAJOBS Resume?

A USAJOBS resume is created specifically for submission to the USAJOBS application website, where federal government positions are available and open to the public to apply. Examples of thousands of high-demand jobs found at USAJOBS include finance, cyber-security, health care, budget analyst, aircraft mechanic, quality control inspector, computer scientist, mathematic statistician, mechanical or civil engineering, contracting and information technology management.

However, a USAJOBS resume is not like a standard resume. In fact, this type of resume is perhaps the most complicated and detailed type of resume to build. One small formatting error or content mistake can automatically disqualify a resume even before it is seen by a hiring manager. The response to a single question can sometimes be grounds for immediate disqualification of your resume.

The federal government must ensure each applicant they accept is the best of the best. In addition, competition for jobs posted at USAJOBS is incredibly steep, since the pay rate, benefits package and long-term stability of federal jobs is high. Unless you’re USAJOBS resume is comprehensive, detailed and formatted properly, and highly competitive it will likely get set aside as not qualified in favor of professionally developed resumes that clearly communicate experience and match the series and grate expertise in the job vacancy announcement.… Read more »

Surprise! These USAJOBS Openings Aren’t Boring

The outsider’s perception of government work is drab. Those of us who don’t work in government have a stereotypical view of “civil service jobs” – the very phrase is boring. We picture large rooms full of cubicles, dim and noisy fluorescent lighting, and bureaucrats dressed in white shirts or conservative business attire. Computer screens glow dimly in each workspace. Numbers are crunched. Everyone wears glasses. An exciting week involves checking out an aging Ford Taurus from the motor pool and going TDY. 

If you like that sort of thing, it’s possible that you can find a federal job and a work environment that matches the image. Stereotypes are made to be broken, though, and actual federal job opportunities provide a broad selection of locations, work environments, and experiences that are far from boring. Some of them are fascinating and even exciting!

Federal Job Postings that seem very cool 

This week, we’re going for a ramble through the USAJOBS website to seek out government career opportunities that defy the drab and boring preconception.… Read more »

Staying On Recruiter Radar with LinkedIn

Even if you live in the wilds of Wyoming and connect to the internet with a radar dish, you’re certainly familiar with LinkedIn. The website is the 14th most popular internet destination, with 143 billion page views each year. LinkedIn is the social network for professionals. It has been in existence since 2003 and now boasts 433 million accounts in over 200 countries.  

If you’re a job seeker, you’ve heard repeatedly that a well-constructed LinkedIn profile is a necessity if you intend to stay on the radar of recruiters and companies with positions to fill. There’s plenty of advice available for setting up your professional LinkedIn page – a quick Google search only produces 4,880,000 results (in .88 seconds). We’ll include a few tips at the end of this post, but skip on the opportunity to write another LinkedIn “how-to.” 

What’s more interesting and potentially more useful to job seekers is a look at how recruiters are using LinkedIn. LinkedIn provides recruiters with an array of resources for hiring and your LinkedIn profile puts you in their radar range.… Read more »

Our “Secret” Approach to Your Resume

It’s really no secret that CareerPro Global (CPG) has been in the resume business for nearly three decades and is a leader in the career services industry. Our tagline is this: “Your career is our business”—and we live it every day. We specialize in federal, military-transition, and Senior Executive Service (SES) applications.

In fact, we’re #1 in the SES business. We do more SES packages than anyone else and the results are impressive (and that’s not just me talking) – check this out!

Having said that, I’d like to focus on the federal resume—the USAJOBS resume. We’ve perfected this format with a “secret weapon.” The resume structure follows the process you will use with the resume builder on the USAJOBS website.

Section by section – word by word – character by character…

The fact that we’ve just built you a resume doesn’t mean that it can simply be uploaded and you’re done. That’s right—some of our clients are surprised to hear that they will need to go in and use the resume builder rather than upload the completed document.… Read more »

Cyber Wars, Cyber Jobs

The spying profession was less technical and more romantic in the 1960s. At least that’s the image we get from the novels and movies of the Cold War. Sean Connery was James Bond, and even if the enemies belonged to nefarious organizations with capitalized acronyms, we all knew that they were Soviet spies. The danger was tangible and immediate – think about SPECTRE agent Rosa Klebb’s spike-toed shoes in From Russia With Love. The Cold War was at it’s height and the threats to the world were nuclear. Despite the sophisticated weaponry in his  Aston Martin, Bond really never went techno.

That was 20th century fiction. The high tech reality of espionage in the 21st century is much less glamorous. Candidate Trump’s debate description of a 400 pound, bedroom-based hacker certainly doesn’t evoke Bond images and the nature of the security threat has (mostly) changed from atomic to cyber. There’s another difficulty with the comparison of Cold War And Cyber War espionage. Cyberthreats certainly exist, but the villains and their motivations can be difficult to identify.… Read more »

Preparing for Interviews: Get Your Stories Straight

My young friend Kelly has an accounting degree. She’s a recent graduate and she just received a job offer to become the bookkeeper for a local construction company. She’s considering the position, but she doesn’t know if she will accept it. She’s just not sure that the company or the job is a good fit. 

“The interview and the offer weren’t what I expected. I was naturally happy to receive a call after they received my resume. The company has a good reputation, but the interview was really kind of unprofessional. They asked a few questions and they seemed to like me, but then they did all of the talking. I obviously made a good first impression, but they didn’t really dig into my qualifications. They made the offer at the end of the first interview and I’m afraid that it was for the wrong reasons.” 

Kelly’s concerns are reasonable, but it’s the managers at the construction firm who should be worried. The old-fashioned “get to know you” interview, followed by quick decisions, can result in expensive hiring mistakes.… Read more »

Why Millennials Should Consider Federal Jobs

Let’s paint with a very broad brush. As the story goes, the millennial generation just doesn’t fit the federal workforce. Federal jobs are perceived as old-fashioned, stodgy, bureaucratic, restrictive, and a dozen more pejorative adjectives that make them undesirable for millennials. It’s conventional wisdom, and like many of the assertions about the 20 – 35 year old age group, it’s just not true.

The much-maligned generation, born between 1980 and 1985, has gotten a very bad rap from employers. Characterizations of this large segment of the US population go something like this:

Millennials are entrepreneurial – more inclined to start businesses of their own than to enter a conventional career.

They’re wired in – the first generation of digital natives to enter the workforce, millennials are early adopters of technology and more likely to consult the internet and contribute their thoughts online than within an organization.

Ideas are valued more than experience – the millennial generation likes collaborative work and dislikes hierarchy and structured career paths. They thrive in open, casual environments where the quality of output is valued more than the time put in.… Read more »

Our American Heroes

Profile of an American Patriot: Lt. Col. Leslie Bryant

Every challenge has a solution. My military background always leads me to think out of the box and to get things done. Typically, I’ve had a limited amount of time to make things happen. I don’t wait to start. I deeply care about what I’m doing and about making a difference through my actions.

– Leslie Bryant, Lt. Colonel, USAF (retired)

There is no doubt that Lt. Colonel Bryant has made a difference throughout her colorful and adventurous career, and probably even before. Part of the fascination of the work we do at CareerPro Global is hearing the stories of our clients as we prepare their resumes, USAJobs and SES applications. Leslie Bryant’s career is so amazing that we asked if we could share just a few of her stories. (Note: hearing the stories is even better than reading them. If you have a few minutes you should definitely take a look at the video below).

The adventures began at an early age.… Read more »

Presidential Politics and the Federal Workforce: What Happens If?

With less than 100 days between now and the November elections, CareerPro Global thought that it might be worthwhile to take a look at some possible outcomes, without inserting any political bias. There are no clear answers, and it’s impossible to avoid some conjecture, but here’s a compilation of the semi-substantive information we uncovered from the candidates’ platforms, their history, their statements and the “experts’” speculation on the impact of the upcoming election on federal government employment. We’ve also included our own “speculative conclusions” for your entertainment.

The “Martial Art” of Resume Writing

It’s called positioning— And it’s as critical in a resume as it is in martial arts! Here’s what I mean . . . A friend of mine is training in the ancient fighting art of Wing Chun kung fu. Following a recent lesson, he shared what he had learned about positioning—he could actually be slower than his opponent and still beat that opponent. The key is to position yourself properly. As he gained knowledge of the Wing Chun methods and the use of peripheral vision, awareness, and interpretation of his opponents’ movements, he discovered that he can actually know what his opponent is going to do before he does it. And the crazy part is, it actually looks as though he’s moving faster than he really is.
Website redesign and Internet marketing by WebpageFX
Sitemap | Terms | Copyright 2012, CareerProPlus, All Right Reserved